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2 edition of Characterization of a murine model of duct carcinoma in situ of the breast. found in the catalog.

Characterization of a murine model of duct carcinoma in situ of the breast.

Stephen David Buttars

Characterization of a murine model of duct carcinoma in situ of the breast.

by Stephen David Buttars

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Published .
Written in English


About the Edition

Duct carcinome in situ (DCIS), an alleged precursor of invasive breast cancer, is characterized by neoplastic epithelial cells growing within mammary ducts. Clinical prognostication for DCIS is challenging, as the likelihood of progression to invasion of individual lesions remains unclear. To circumvent issues surrounding the study of DCIS in humans, the MMTVneu202 mouse, previously reported to develop DCIS-like mammary lesions, was employed. Necropsied mouse mammary tumours were investigated using multiple approaches, beginning with morphological and histological assessment. A set of clinical and investigational immunohistochemical markers was applied to develop a tumour profile. Finally, DNA was extracted from fixed tumour tissue and examined using microarray comparative genomic hybridization. Results indicate that the MMTVneu202 mouse represents a useful model for the study of DCIS. Additionally, molecular differences between DCIS and invasive tumours have been identified which may be employed to further investigate the natural history and progression of DCIS.

The Physical Object
Pagination113 leaves.
Number of Pages113
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19551724M
ISBN 109780494212608

Figure 1. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded breast tissues (normal duct, ductal carcinoma in situ, or invasive ductal carcinoma) were stained with H&E (A and D) or reacted with antibody to CXCR3 (B, E, and G) or isotype control (C and F).Both tumor samples are graded as 3+ staining; the normal duct is negative for CXCR3 expression. Menell, J H Morris, E A Dershaw, D D Determination of the presence and extent of pure ductal carcinoma in situ by mammography and magnetic resonance imaging Breast J 11 Tozaki, M Fukuda, K High-spatial-resolution MRI of non-masslike breast lesions: interpretation based on BI-RADS MRI descriptors AJR Am J Roentgenol

What is ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)? Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is the name for abnormal changes in the cells in the milk ducts of the breast. 'In situ' means 'in place'. DCIS is a non-invasive breast cancer. The abnormal cells are contained inside the milk ducts. What’s the difference between DCIS and invasive breast cancer? The abnormal cells seen in DCIS are cancer. JoEllen Welsh, in Animal Models for the Study of Human Disease, Models of DCIS. DCIS is the most common type (80%) of noninvasive breast lesion and is considered a precursor of invasive ductal carcinoma. 6,69 While the vast majority of women will not face recurrence after removal of DCIS, there are no validated biomarkers to stratify the subset of patients who will from those who will not.

carcinoma is defined as invasive carcinoma of the breast with no invasive focus measuring more than 1 mm. It is almost always encountered in the setting of ductal carcinoma in situ . The consequence of activation status or gain/loss of an X-chromosome in terms of the expression of tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes in breast cancer has not been clearly addressed. In this study, we investigated the activation status of the X-chromosomes in a panel of human breast cancer cell lines, human breast carcinoma, and adjacent mammary tissues and a panel of murine mammary.


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Characterization of a murine model of duct carcinoma in situ of the breast by Stephen David Buttars Download PDF EPUB FB2

Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) will account cases of breast cancer in DCIS is a pre-invasive lesion which may not progress to invasive carcinoma Author: Sunitha Bachawal, Gregory R. Bean, Gregor Krings, Katheryne E.

Wilson. Animals. The C3(1) SV large T antigen mouse model was used in this study. Female mice develop spontaneous orthotopic mammary cancer that resembles human ductal carcinoma, including progression through atypical ductal hyperplasia (at approximately 8 weeks of age), DCIS (at approximately 12 weeks of age), and invasive ductal carcinoma (at approximately 16 weeks of age) Cited by: Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS), also known as intraductal carcinoma, accounts for one of every five new breast cancer diagnoses.

It's an uncontrolled growth of cells within the breast ducts. Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer type and the leading cause of cancer death among women worldwide 1, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) accounts for 15%–30% of all breast Cited by: 1. To characterize ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and its subtypes on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI).

We retrospectively reviewed 74 pure DCIS lesions in 69 women who underwent DWI at T (b = 0 and s/mm2). Each lesion was characterized by qualitative DWI intensity, quantitative DWI lesion-to-normal contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and quantitative apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC).Cited by: Ductal Carcinoma in Situ is a non-invasive form of breast cancer, in which malignant ductal epithelial cells proliferate, but do not invade through the basement membrane.

It is a heterogeneous disease, and is a non-obligate precursor to invasive carcinoma. In a subsequent report by Pfefferle et al., the team of investigators expanded the genomic analysis, and they compared the transcriptomic profiles of 27 murine models of mammary carcinoma and normal mammary tissues to human breast cancer subtypes.

The new study also included a few ERα-positive tumors from Stat1 knockout mice and the Pik3ca. Molecular Characterization of the Transition to Malignancy in a Genetically Engineered Mouse-Based Model of Ductal Carcinoma In situ Ruria Namba,1 Jeannie E. Maglione,2 Lawrence J.T. Young,2 Alexander D.

Borowsky,1,2 Robert D. Cardiff,1,2 Carol L. MacLeod,3 and Jeffrey P. Gregg1 1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, School of Medicine and 2Center for Comparative Medicine. Breast tumors evolve via sequential progression through defined stages, starting with epithelial hyperproliferation and progressing to in situ, invasive, and metastatic carcinomas [].Both clinical and experimental data suggest that ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a precursor of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC; Figure 2A, B) [9,10].DCIS lesions contain proliferating neoplastic cells confined.

The mechanisms that drive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) progression to invasive cancer are not clear. Studying DCIS progression in humans is challenging and not ethical, thus necessitating the characterization of an animal model that faithfully resembles human disease.

We have characterized a canine model of spontaneous mammary DCIS and invasive cancer that shares histologic, molecular. In breast cancer, the surrounding microenvironment, including stromal fibroblasts, is believed to promote the progression of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive ductal carcinoma [].

Indeed, human mammary fibroblasts cultured in a 3D matrix have been shown to secrete more paracrine signaling molecules than in 2D monolayer cultures.

The ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the mammary gland represents an early, pre-invasive stage in the development of invasive breast carcinoma. Since DCIS is a curable disease, it would be highly desirable to identify molecular markers that allow early detection.

Mice transgenic for the WAP-SV40 early genome region were used as a model for DCIS development. Breast tumors evolve via sequential progression through defined stages, starting with epithelial hyperproliferation and progressing to in situ, invasive, and metastatic carcinomas [].Both clinical and experimental data suggest that ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a precursor of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC; Figure 2A, B) [9, 10].DCIS lesions contain proliferating neoplastic cells.

this common form of breast cancer starts in the milk ducts, which lie beneath the skin and lead to the nipple. there are two types: * ductal carcinoma in situ, also called intraductal carcinoma * in.

Ductal carcinoma in situ: x-ray fluorescence microscopy and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging reveals gadolinium uptake within neoplastic mammary ducts in a murine model.

Radiology ;(2)– Link, Google Scholar; 2 Leonard GD, Swain SM. Ductal carcinoma in situ, complexities and challenges. J Natl Cancer Inst ;96(12)– Background: To test and introduce effective and less toxic breast cancer (BC) treatment strategies, animal models, including murine BC cell lines, are considered as perfect platforms.

Strikingly, the knowledge on the genetic background of applied BC cell lines is often sparse though urgently necessary for their targeted and really justified application. Methods: In this study, we performed the. KEYWORDS: breast, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), grading, fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC).

B reast carcinoma is the most common malignancy in women worldwide. In Norway approximately new cases are diag-nosed each year and patients die of the disease.1 The treatment of breast carcinoma is centralized to optimize management.

With increasing adoption of mammography, the incidence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) has risen dramatically. DCIS currently represents up to 33% of the malignancies identified by mammograms 1, 2 and >25% of new breast cancer diagnoses.

3, 4 Although mastectomy was once the standard surgical procedure for the treatment of DCIS, the majority of newly diagnosed patients now undergo breast. Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), also known as infiltrating ductal carcinoma, is cancer that began growing in a milk duct and has invaded the fibrous or fatty tissue of the breast outside of the duct.

IDC is the most common form of breast cancer, representing 80 percent of all breast cancer diagnoses. The breast epithelium is a bilayer composed of luminal cells and basal (myoepithelial) cells arranged in ducts and lobules, and cancers can arise from both cell types in either location.

6 Ductal carcinoma is the most commonly diagnosed type of human breast cancer (accounting for approximately 85% of all breast cancers).

Ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast (also called intraductal carcinoma), a clonal proliferation of malignant-appearing cells within the mammary duct lumens without evidence of invasion beyond th.Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a noninvasive malignant breast disease entity traditionally described as a precursor lesion to invasive breast cancer.

With the advent of screening mammography, what once was an uncommonly identified breast lesion now accounts for approximately 20% of newly diagnosed breast cancer cases [ 1 ].Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a noninvasive premalignant lesion and is considered a precursor to invasive carcinoma.

DCIS accounts for nearly 20% of newly diagnosed breast cancer, but the lack of experimentally amenable in vivo DCIS models hinders the development of treatment strategies. Here, we demonstrate the utility of a mouse transplantation model of DCIS for chemoprevention studies.