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Sunday, July 19, 2020 | History

5 edition of Amphibians and reptiles of Connecticut and adjacent regions found in the catalog.

Amphibians and reptiles of Connecticut and adjacent regions

Michael W. Klemens

Amphibians and reptiles of Connecticut and adjacent regions

by Michael W. Klemens

  • 158 Want to read
  • 25 Currently reading

Published by State Geological and Natural History Survey of Connecticut in Hartford .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Connecticut.,
  • New England.
    • Subjects:
    • Amphibians -- Connecticut.,
    • Reptiles -- Connecticut.,
    • Amphibians -- New England.,
    • Reptiles -- New England.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementMichael W. Klemens.
      SeriesBulletin ;, no. 112, Bulletin (State Geological and Natural History Survey of Connecticut) ;, 112.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsQL653.C8 K58 1993
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxii, 318 p., 32 p. of plates :
      Number of Pages318
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1049748M
      ISBN 100942081048
      LC Control Number93622772
      OCLC/WorldCa28658247

      Reptiles and Amphibians of South Carolina and Georgia. Follow the links to access species information, images, and distribution maps for the herpetofauna of our region: Snakes: Alligators: Turtles: Lizards: Frogs and Toads: Salamanders. Send your suggestions, comments, or questions to: [email protected] Boy's Book of Snakes: How to Recognize and Understand Them. A volume of the Humanizing Science Series, edited by Jacques Cattell. Ronald Press. New York. viii + pp. ("The Hog-Nosed Snake", "Heterodon platyrhinos", pp. 52–57, ) Zim, H.S., and H.M. Smith. Reptiles and Amphibians: A Guide to Familiar American Species: A Golden.

        In our region the northern black racer is one of two large black snakes, with the other being the eastern rat snake. It is declining in our region due to habitat change, fragmentation and loss. It is an active daytime hunter (as Russell and I found out) and a fast-moving snake that hunts over an extensive home range.   At 30, acres, Pachaug is the largest state forest in Connecticut, though occasional Colonial-era cellar holes and miles of stone walls winding through the woods indicate that it .

      Reptiles and Amphibians Interactive - Online This awesome resource serves as an online reference about reptiles and amphibians. Students simply click to learn. 30 different species profiles are available.   Frogs, toads, salamanders, caecilians, turtles, lizards, crocodiles, and numerous species of snakes in the Petén region of northern Guatemala and adjacent terrain in Mexico and Belize are illustrated and profiled in this first field guide to the reptiles and amphibians of the s: 2.


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Amphibians and reptiles of Connecticut and adjacent regions by Michael W. Klemens Download PDF EPUB FB2

Buy Amphibians and Reptiles of Connecticut and Adjacent Regions (State Geological and Natural History Survey of Connecticut - Bulletin No. Cited by: Amphibians & Reptiles of Connecticut & Adjacent Regions (Bulletin Series, No ) by Michael W.

Klemens and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at Amphibians and reptiles of Connecticut and adjacent regions. Hartford: State Geological and Natural History Survey of Connecticut, (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Michael W Klemens.

Amphibians and Reptiles of Connecticut and Adjacent Regions. Amphibians and Reptiles of Connecticut and Adjacent Regions. Request an Image Overseas orders are billed at cost. Books may be returned within 10 days for whatever reason, provided their condition has not been altered.

We request that you notify us in advance of returns. A Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians: Eastern/Central North America. Boston: Houghton Mifflin. Klemens, M.W. Amphibians and Reptiles of Connecticut and Adjacent Regions. Hartford, CT: State Geological and Natural History Survey of Connecticut Bulletin pp.

Credits. Text by Gregory J. Watkins-Colwell. Resources on Amphibians and Reptiles Books. A Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles by Thomas F.

Tyning. Little Brown & Co. Amphibians and Reptiles of Connecticut and Adjacent Regions by Michael W. Klemens. State Geological and Natural History Survey of Connecticut. The only true tree frog in the state of Connecticut. References. Conant, R.

and J.T. Collins. A Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians: Eastern/Central North America. Boston: Houghton Mifflin. Klemens, M.W. Amphibians and Reptiles of Connecticut and Adjacent Regions.

A Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians: Eastern/Central North America. Boston: Houghton Mifflin. Klemens, M.W. Amphibians and Reptiles of Connecticut and Adjacent Regions. Hartford, CT: State Geological and Natural History Survey of Connecticut Bulletin pp.

Credits. Text by Gregory J. Watkins-Colwell. Photographs. In book: The Fauna of the Aggtelek National Park II, Chapter: Amphibians and reptiles from the Aggtelek Karst region, Publisher: Hungarian Natural History Museum, Editors: Mahunka S, pp   Although lizards and salamanders look alike, they are not closely related.

Lizards are reptiles and are more closely related to snakes and turtles. Salamanders are amphibians, the same as frogs and toads. The redback salamander occurs in forested areas throughout Connecticut, sometimes in high numbers.

dependent amphibians and reptiles. I am the author of several books, and numerous peer-reviewed publications including Bulletin of the Connecticut Geological and Natural History entitled The Amphibians and Reptiles of Connecticut and Adjacent Regions. I have published. Amphibians and Reptiles of Connecticut and Adjacent Regions avg rating — 0 ratings — published Want to Read saving.

Klemens MW () Amphibians and reptiles of Connecticut and adjacent regions. State Geological and Natural History Survey of Connecticut. Bulletin No. Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, Hartford, Connecticut, USA Google Scholar. SNAKES in Connecticut A Guide to Snake Identification Connecticut Department of reptiles and amphibians of eastern and central North America.

3d ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. Klemens, M. Amphibians and reptiles of Connecticut and adjacent regions. Bull. State Geol.

Nat. Hist. Surv. of Connecticut. Peterson. Amphibians and Reptiles of Connecticut and Adjacent Regions. Michael W. Klemens. Amphibians & Reptiles in Connecticut. A Checklist with Notes on Conservation, Status, Identification, and Distribution.

Brian Kleinman. Between Land & Water. Life Stories of Connecticut's Amphibians. Amphibians and Reptiles of Connecticut and Adjacent Regions. State Geological and Natural History Survey of Connecticut, Bulletin No.

Unfortunately this is currently out of print. Amphibians and reptiles of Connecticut and adjacent regions. State Geological and Natural History Survey of Connecticut, Bulletin No. Krulikowski, L. If you encounter a snake problem, assistance and more information about snakes can be found by visiting the Snakes in Connecticut webpage or calling the DEEP Wildlife Division at Amphibians and Reptiles of Connecticut and Adjacent Regions, by Michael W.

Klemens (), was used as reference for this fact sheet. If you have an unusual sighting of a reptile or amphibian at the Audubon Center, please report your observation to the staff naturalists or record it in the sightings log at the Kimberlin Center.

Reference: Amphibians and Reptiles of Connecticut and Adjacent Regions by Michael W. Klemens; State Geological and Natural History Survey of. Examples taken from amphibians and reptiles throughout the world make this book a useful herpetology textbook in several countries.

Naturalists, amateur herpetologists, herpetoculturists, zoo professionals, and many others will find this book readable and full of relevant natural history and distributional information. Amphibians & Reptiles of Connecticut & Adjacent Regions (Bulletin Series, No ) Amphibians & Reptiles of Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks Amphibians & Reptiles: Native to Minnesota Amphibians and Reptiles in 3-D Amphibians and Reptiles in Colorado Amphibians and Reptiles in .Klemens, M.W.

Amphibians and reptiles of Connecticut and adjacent regions. State Geological and Natural History Survey of Connecticut. Bulletin No Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, Hartford, Connecticut, USA.Garter snake is a common name for the generally harmless, small to medium-sized snakes belonging to the genus Thamnophis.

Endemic to North and Central America, species in the genus Thamnophis can be found from the subarctic plains of Canada to Costa common garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis) is the state reptile of length of garter snakes varies from 46 to cm (